PUBLIC ART

Murals, sculptures and stained glass
by Juan Bernal
Murales gobernacion de Cundinamarca, Bogota

"Gigantes de los Andes"

Gobernor's headquarters, Bogota, Colombia
acrilyc on brick, 17 x 10 meters, each.
Murals of wax palms, Colombia's national trees.

"Gigantes de los Andes II"

Colombian consulate, New York.
Oil on canvas, 3 x 3 Mts.
Palmas de cera, arbol nacional de Colombia
Mural Consulado de Colombia, New York, Juan Bernal

Public art humanizes cities making them kinder, taking art out of museums and galleries and reaching people that otherwise wouldn’t have much contact with it, giving them the opportunity of establishing a certain communication with other spectators, creating a feeling of appropriation of public spaces.

H2o = Water, public art mural, Yonkers, NY.

"H2O = Life"

Yonkers, New York.
Acrilyc on brick, 8 x 13.5 Feet.
Public art mural
Public art, DC. Commission for the Arts

"Bamburrito"

Party animals, Washington D.C.
Acrilyc on fiberglass sculpture
D.C. commission for the arts and humanities
Panda, You are what you eat

"You are what you eat"

Pandamania, Washington D.C.
Acrilyc on fiberglass sculpture
D.C. commission for the arts and humanities
Tropical bird public art Ocean City MA.
Ocean City, Maryland.
Acrilyc on fiberglass sculpture
Arte publico en Ocean City, MA.

"Tropical Bird"

"Metamorphosis"

Art walk, Public art, Washington DC.
Washington D.C.
Art walk
D.C. commission for the arts and humanities

"Metamorphosis"

Washington D.C.
Art walk
D.C. commission for the arts and humanities
Public art, Washington DC.
Stained glass, consevatorio de musica del Tolima

"Inmaculate Conception"

Stained glass.
Music Conservatory, ibague, Colombia.
Vidriera enplomada

"Hotel Victoria Regia"

Stained glass.
Bogota, Colombia.
Plafon de vitrales
Stained glass lamp, victoria Regia Hotel, Bogota, Colombia

"Hotel Bogota Royal"

Stained glass.
Bogota, Colombia.
Vitrales

"Hotel Casa Medina"

Stained glass.
Bogota, Colombia.
Vidrieras artisticas
Stained glass by Juan Bernal
Vidrieras hotel Casa Medina, Bogota
Vitrales Casa Medina, Colombia

"Hotel Casa Medina"

Leaded glass By Juan Bernal
Stained glass
Bogota, Colombia
Vitrail

"Roseton"

Stained glass
Bogota, Colombia
Vidrios emplomados

"Plafon"

Stained glass
Bogota, Colombia
Leaded glass
Roseton, vidriera emplomada por Juan Bernal
Cometas, vidriera por Juan bernal

"Cometas"

Stained glass
Bogota, Colombia
Vidrios de colores
Comet, colored glass window by Juan Bernal

"Cometa"

Stained glass
Bogota, Colombia
Colored glass

PUBLIC ART

Murals, stained glass windows, sculptures

by Juan Bernal

 

Public art humanizes cities making them kinder, taking art out of museums and galleries and reaching people that otherwise wouldn’t have much contact with it, giving them the opportunity of establishing a certain communication with other spectators, creating a feeling of appropriation of public spaces.

Stained glass windows are composed of small pieces of colored glass, arranged to form patterns or pictures, held together by strips of lead.

This technique is considered an art and a craft, many leadlights have withstood the test of time and remained substantially intact since the late middle ages. Conceived initially as church windows, depicting narratives from the Bible, today they are used in commercial buildings and luxury homes incorporating geometrical and vegetal motifs.

Instead of reflecting light like most works of art, with leadlights we perceive the rays of light that pass through the windows directly, they travel across space producing colored projections on the surface of floors and walls, constantly changing according to the sun’s location, constituting a real kinetic art form.

Glass is made by fusing sand, lime and soda at over 1.500 degrees Celsius, mixture which in turn solidifies at 800 degrees. Its molecular structure is similar to that of a liquid, which allows it to let light pass through.

Cenefa.jpg