Sunflower

Girasol

Photo, graphite and watercolor on paper, 10 x 10 inches
Sun flower, mixed media

Simplicity is the secret of beauty.

Papyrus

Photo and watercolor on paper, 13 x 19 inches
Papyrus leaf

Dalia Amarilla

Photo and oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches
Yellow flower with dew

Yellow Dahlia

Photo and oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches
Flor amarilla con rocio

Wild Poppy

Amapola

Photo and oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches
Red flower in mixed media

Miltonia

Photo and oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches
Red orchid with dew

Hybiscus

Photo and oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches
Pink flower with water droplets

Pink Dahlia

Photo and oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches
Flor con gotas de agua

Catleyas

Photo and oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches
Catleya Triana

Ipomea

Batatilla

Photo and oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches
Blue flower with dew
La flor sencilla la modesta flor

White Gerbera with Dew

Photo and oil on canvas, 20 x 30 inches
Painting and photograph

Paphiopedilum

Photo and watercolor on paper, 12 x 12 inches
Green orchid

Peony

Photo and watercolor on canvas, 40 x 40  inches
Tecnica mixta, pintura y fotografia

PHOTO-FRAGMENTS

Mixed media photography and painting.

By Juan Bernal

 

Photography has been a very important part of my work, I’ve used it as a stepping stone for my paintings, employing the images I take, transforming and redesigning them.

My paintings are the work of an architect in search of composition, balance, spaces and volumes, based on the geometry of nature, creating my own interpretation.

In this series, on any given work, I use a fragment of a photograph and do a partial print on paper or canvas and then I paint around it, preserving the fragment or changing it as little as possible. 

Sometimes, especially at the beginning of the series, I completed the pieces in such a way that it’s difficult to be certain what is photography and what is painting. Later on I have intentionally made the differences more noticeable, sometimes putting them on separate canvases, to let the photo stand for itself, leaving the painted fraction unfinished for contrast.